Monday, September 10, 2018

How to Change in Midstream




By Adriana Girolami


Individual writing style is the hallmark of most authors. There are so many different ways to approach a story line. Some develop an idea a little at a time. Others make detailed research and write copious notes. I usually have a story in my mind, and then I simply embellish it as I write it on my computer. I research the historical facts. Yet, I only write minimal notes.

Recently, a fellow author confided in me with some frustration, her desire to finish a novel she started writing a couple of years before. She never completed it because of a sudden lack of interest. It was distressing to the lady that her exciting idea was now wasted. Instead, it languished on her desk collecting dust.

I was unable to give her any useful advice, since I never had the experience myself. I suggested the usual line: "Read again what is already written, then try to rekindle the original excitement of the story bringing it to completion".

At that time, I had just completed my Knights Templar Trilogy, and was busy writing a new novel. As usual, I had the storyline pretty much developed in my mind. With that, I was writing it down with some enthusiasm.

However, during that period I attended a party. This was where I was introduced by a friend to an interesting subject. It was about the Zamindars of India. They were feudal lords who governed for a couple of hundred years until their fall from power. The premise intrigued me, and I decided to make it my next project. That is, right after the completion of the novel I was presently writing.

However, soon after something strange happened. My pace of writing was slowing down, and my excitement in the story was waning. It was difficult to understand the reason why.  My mind wondered in different directions. I become concerned since it never happened to me before.

As my writing stalled, I began researching online for more information about the Zamindars. Finding great pleasure in reading about them, different story lines quickly flashed through my mind. Fortunately, the original excitement as a writer was back. However, it was not connected to the story presently being written by me.

It should have been a simple choice at that point. Abandon for the time being, the novel in progress and start writing the story that suddenly resonated with me.

At first, it was disruptive to my writing style and proved uncomfortable. Soon it became abundantly clear that creativity is the only guiding light worth following. It should take precedence even at the expense of structure and writing habits. If the enthusiasm dies down, let go of the project at hand. I suggest all aspiring authors to do that for the time being. You will eventually get back to it. I know I will! Follow your creativity to guide you until a happy completion of your newest, exciting novel.
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Adriana Girolami is an historical romance author. She was born in Rome, Italy and credits the ancient beauty of her native country for her love of history. She immigrated to the United States and attended The Art Students League in New York City. She is a professional portrait artist who loves to write and express her creativity not only with a brush, but also with the power of the written words. Her debut novel, Mysterious Templar, is now a part of "The Knights Templar Trilogy" followed by The Crimson Amulet and Templar's Redemption, the third book just published. Being also an artist she particularly enjoys painting the covers for all her books. She is a world traveler, and has been privileged accompanied by her husband to visit many beautiful places in the world. Since her work is sedentary, she exercises faithfully, loves to jog, plays racquetball and has a black belt in Kenpo Karate. She always looks forward to a special tomorrow and writing her next exciting novel.

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